Barry Moore ready for next step in the journey

Barry Moore will be sworn in as the Second Congressional District's Representative in the United States House of Representatives next month.

“Take the job seriously but do not take yourself too seriously.”

That is advice that Barry Moore is taking to heart as he begins a new journey in Washington, D.C. as a member of the 117thCongress.

Moore was elected to Alabama’s Second Congressional District Representative seat Nov. 3 after defeating Phyllis Harvey-Hall, the Democrat Party candidate. Moore garnered some 64.5 percent of the votes cast district wide to 35.5 percent garnered by Harvey-Hall.

Coffee and Dale Counties followed the districtwide choice. In Coffee County Moore had 80.36 percent of the votes to Harvey-Hall’s 19.57 percent. In Dale County, Moore had 73.70 percent of the votes to Harvey-Hall’s 26.20 percent.

Moore had defeated primary frontrunner and Dothan businessman Jeff Coleman March 3 in a runoff after seven candidates first threw their hat into the GOP ring for the seat being vacated by Martha Roby. Elected to Congress in 2010, Roby did not seek reelection.

Moore’s political career began with his election to the Alabama House of Representatives from the 91stDistrict in 2010 and reelection in 2014. In the Alabama House, Moore served as chairman of the Military and Veteran’s Affairs committee and sponsored legislation to bring the F-35 Fighter Squadron to the state.

In 2018, he gave up his seat in the Alabama House of Representatives to challenge Roby but failed to make the 2018 Republican primary runoff. “When we lost in 2018, that was difficult,” Moore said. “You just don’t know how the Lord will call you to walk certain paths sometimes and it seems like He’s not there, it seems like He’s let you down but what He’s done is just require you to trust Him.

“That (election loss) allowed us to lay the ground work to be in 2020 where we were at now,” he added. 

Moore grew up on a family farm in Coffee County, graduated from Enterprise High School in 1984 and graduated from Auburn University with a degree in agriculture science. While at Auburn, he enlisted in the Alabama National Guard and Reserves and was a member of the Army Ranger Challenge Team in Auburn’s ROTC program. 

In 1998, Moore and his wife, Heather Hopper Moore, started Barry Moore Industries, a waste disposal business, with one garbage truck. More than 20 years later, BMI Inc. continues to grow. Heather will be going with him to D.C. “I think it’s important to have ‘that person,’” Moore said about his wife of 28 years. “She is politically astute but also she is there to keep me grounded.”

A self-described “garbage man from Battens Crossroads,” Moore ran as a conservative, a veteran, a proponent of term limits and as the “first elected official in Alabama to publically endorse Donald Trump” for United States President, which he did at a rally in Mobile in Aug. 21, 2015.

In 2016, Moore was a delegate at the National Convention along with his daughter Kathleen, who was the youngest delegate in the nation.  

“We’ll fight this on our knees,” has been Moore’s mantra during his campaigns. “We’ll be in prayer and I need your prayers because it is a mess in Washington, D.C. 

“There is a spiritual battle going on for this country. It’s not a political party battle, it’s not a race battle,’ he said often. “It’s a spiritual-need battle for the future of our nation.”

Moore said he learned early in life that a man’s hands say a lot about him. He said that hard work, moral integrity and a true love for God and country shaped not only his own hands but his heart. “I was raised in church and even played the drums in a Christian band,” Moore recalled. “I always had a calling I felt early on in my life. I always felt like there was something in my life that was guiding my steps. I’m not saying I didn’t make mistakes, but I always felt like I was called to make sure I did right by people and to set a good example.

“I failed miserably many times,” he added with a smile. “I think I grew up with the faith, grew up with the process. But the Lord told me in 1998, ‘I would rather you have to trust me than for you to know the outcome.’ 

“So what that meant to me was that I was going to be called to walk in faith at times that didn’t make much sense and I began to trust Him more,” he said. 

Faith, family, finance and freedom are the fundamentals that Moore says guide every aspect of his life. “In all decisions as a legislator, I measured the consequences of any bill on these four fundamentals.” 

From running a business to running for Congress, that’s a journey that Moore feels that he is being called on. “To me, man does not have the solution for the problems we face in the nation or the world, it’s always been a calling—about seeking the Lord,” he said. “A lot of times we have to just pursue what He has called us to do. 

“My life, my process, has been a refining of that fire for the Lord to humble me,” Moore said. “He’s always said that obedience is greater than sacrifice so I knew I’d be sacrificing being at home being on the road a lot, campaigning.” 

About campaigning Moore said he enjoys meeting people but not the political process. “He told me to yield and just do what I was told to do,” he said.

Moore said he did not have the financial backing of major special interest groups during any of his campaigns. “We weren’t the most funded but the Lord told me early on, you don’t depend on man or the mountain of money. He said you depend on me,” he said. “None of ‘the establishment’ got behind us, they all picked other candidates. I knew then that I had to rely on Him because I knew there was no man, no association, no money, no anything that was going to do this short of the Lord.

“I’m just honored and humbled to be where I’m at in this process of my life,” Moore said. “Hopefully I will adhere to those principals and do justly.  

“Doing justly doesn’t always mean telling people what they want to hear. You can do it in love but you still have to be honest and truthful and the truth will set so many free in this nation,” Moore said. “I think we are at a point in the nation that we have to speak truth.

“It’s hard to explain what’s happened in my life but I know this. There is something the Lord is going to do, something in our nation and I think we’re going to be a part of it,” Moore said. “I think it’s more important that we be ‘prayed up’ than have a good political speech. It’s more important that we seek Him and humble ourselves if we truly want to make a difference. 

“There are opportunities for us to minister to people again and again and again,” Moore said. “It’s an interesting time in our nation. I used to tell my Sunday School kids that sin will take you further than you want to go, keep you longer than you want to stay and charge you a price much higher than you were ever willing to pay. 

“Sometimes politicians are so concerned about staying where they are that they really are afraid to stand up and speak out because it might not be the best thing for their political career,” Moore said. “The fortunate thing about me is that I do not have a political career. 

“The Lord doesn’t tell me what he wants me to do, he just calls me to the next steps of obedience,” he added. “God can work all things together for good, even the difficult times in our lives.

“Nobody wants to be in the valley but nothing grows on the mountain tops because the air is real thin up there,” Moore said. “To me it’s when you’re down in the valley that the most growth occurs.

“Without the difficulties I would never be the person that I am,” he added. “I am so grateful because it is those difficult times that really transformed my heart. 

“So for two years or 200 years, whatever God decides is his plan, I’m going to try to stay on that path,” the eldest son of Billy Moore and Elaine Galloway said reflecting on the next step in his journey. “It’s a huge responsibility. I ask that you pray for me and for our nation going forward

By Michelle Mann

mmann@southeastsun.com

“Take the job seriously but do not take yourself too seriously.”

That is advice that Barry Moore is taking to heart as he begins a new journey in Washington, D.C. as a member of the 117th Congress.

Moore was elected to Alabama’s Second Congressional District Representative seat Nov. 3 after defeating Phyllis Harvey-Hall, the Democrat Party candidate. Moore garnered some 64.5 percent of the votes cast district wide to 35.5 percent garnered by Harvey-Hall.

Coffee and Dale Counties followed the districtwide choice. In Coffee County Moore had 80.36 percent of the votes to Harvey-Hall’s 19.57 percent. In Dale County, Moore had 73.70 percent of the votes to Harvey-Hall’s 26.20 percent.

Moore had defeated primary frontrunner and Dothan businessman Jeff Coleman March 3 in a runoff after seven candidates first threw their hat into the GOP ring for the seat being vacated by Martha Roby. Elected to Congress in 2010, Roby did not seek reelection.

Moore’s political career began with his election to the Alabama House of Representatives from the 91st District in 2010 and reelection in 2014. In the Alabama House, Moore served as chairman of the Military and Veteran’s Affairs committee and sponsored legislation to bring the F-35 Fighter Squadron to the state.

In 2018, he gave up his seat in the Alabama House of Representatives to challenge Roby but failed to make the 2018 Republican primary runoff. “When we lost in 2018, that was difficult,” Moore said. “You just don’t know how the Lord will call you to walk certain paths sometimes and it seems like He’s not there, it seems like He’s let you down but what He’s done is just require you to trust Him.

“That (election loss) allowed us to lay the ground work to be in 2020 where we were at now,” he added.

Moore grew up on a family farm in Coffee County, graduated from Enterprise High School in 1984 and graduated from Auburn University with a degree in agriculture science. While at Auburn, he enlisted in the Alabama National Guard and Reserves and was a member of the Army Ranger Challenge Team in Auburn’s ROTC program.

In 1998, Moore and his wife, Heather Hopper Moore, started Barry Moore Industries, a waste disposal business, with one garbage truck. More than 20 years later, BMI Inc. continues to grow. Heather will be going with him to D.C. “I think it’s important to have ‘that person,’” Moore said about his wife of 28 years. “She is politically astute but also she is there to keep me grounded.”

A self-described “garbage man from Battens Crossroads,” Moore ran as a conservative, a veteran, a proponent of term limits and as the “first elected official in Alabama to publically endorse Donald Trump” for United States President, which he did at a rally in Mobile in Aug. 21, 2015.

In 2016, Moore was a delegate at the National Convention along with his daughter Kathleen, who was the youngest delegate in the nation.

“We’ll fight this on our knees,” has been Moore’s mantra during his campaigns. “We’ll be in prayer and I need your prayers because it is a mess in Washington, D.C.

“There is a spiritual battle going on for this country. It’s not a political party battle, it’s not a race battle,’ he said often. “It’s a spiritual-need battle for the future of our nation.”

Moore said he learned early in life that a man’s hands say a lot about him. He said that hard work, moral integrity and a true love for God and country shaped not only his own hands but his heart. “I was raised in church and even played the drums in a Christian band,” Moore recalled. “I always had a calling I felt early on in my life. I always felt like there was something in my life that was guiding my steps. I’m not saying I didn’t make mistakes, but I always felt like I was called to make sure I did right by people and to set a good example.

“I failed miserably many times,” he added with a smile. “I think I grew up with the faith, grew up with the process. But the Lord told me in 1998, ‘I would rather you have to trust me than for you to know the outcome.’

“So what that meant to me was that I was going to be called to walk in faith at times that didn’t make much sense and I began to trust Him more,” he said.

Faith, family, finance and freedom are the fundamentals that Moore says guide every aspect of his life. “In all decisions as a legislator, I measured the consequences of any bill on these four fundamentals.”

From running a business to running for Congress, that’s a journey that Moore feels that he is being called on. “To me, man does not have the solution for the problems we face in the nation or the world, it’s always been a calling—about seeking the Lord,” he said. “A lot of times we have to just pursue what He has called us to do.

“My life, my process, has been a refining of that fire for the Lord to humble me,” Moore said. “He’s always said that obedience is greater than sacrifice so I knew I’d be sacrificing being at home being on the road a lot, campaigning.”

About campaigning Moore said he enjoys meeting people but not the political process. “He told me to yield and just do what I was told to do,” he said.

Moore said he did not have the financial backing of major special interest groups during any of his campaigns. “We weren’t the most funded but the Lord told me early on, you don’t depend on man or the mountain of money. He said you depend on me,” he said. “None of ‘the establishment’ got behind us, they all picked other candidates. I knew then that I had to rely on Him because I knew there was no man, no association, no money, no anything that was going to do this short of the Lord.

“I’m just honored and humbled to be where I’m at in this process of my life,” Moore said. “Hopefully I will adhere to those principals and do justly.

“Doing justly doesn’t always mean telling people what they want to hear. You can do it in love but you still have to be honest and truthful and the truth will set so many free in this nation,” Moore said. “I think we are at a point in the nation that we have to speak truth.

“It’s hard to explain what’s happened in my life but I know this. There is something the Lord is going to do, something in our nation and I think we’re going to be a part of it,” Moore said. “I think it’s more important that we be ‘prayed up’ than have a good political speech. It’s more important that we seek Him and humble ourselves if we truly want to make a difference.

“There are opportunities for us to minister to people again and again and again,” Moore said. “It’s an interesting time in our nation. I used to tell my Sunday School kids that sin will take you further than you want to go, keep you longer than you want to stay and charge you a price much higher than you were ever willing to pay.

“Sometimes politicians are so concerned about staying where they are that they really are afraid to stand up and speak out because it might not be the best thing for their political career,” Moore said. “The fortunate thing about me is that I do not have a political career.

“The Lord doesn’t tell me what he wants me to do, he just calls me to the next steps of obedience,” he added. “God can work all things together for good, even the difficult times in our lives.

“Nobody wants to be in the valley but nothing grows on the mountain tops because the air is real thin up there,” Moore said. “To me it’s when you’re down in the valley that the most growth occurs.

“Without the difficulties I would never be the person that I am,” he added. “I am so grateful because it is those difficult times that really transformed my heart.

“So for two years or 200 years, whatever God decides is his plan, I’m going to try to stay on that path,” the eldest son of Billy Moore and Elaine Galloway said reflecting on the next step in his journey. “It’s a huge responsibility. I ask that you pray for me and for our nation going forward

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.