James Earl (Jimmy) Henderson

One of the truly great story tellers, adventurers, and family men was lost to this world Tuesday night, July 9, 2019. James Earl (Jimmy) Henderson – known as Poppie to his grand and great grandchildren – went to be with his Lord and Savior after a brief illness. Per Jimmy’s request, there will be no formal visitation. A celebration of life for family and loved ones will be held Thursday, July 11, at Searcy Funeral Home at 11 a.m. In his own words “I know who my friends are and that they love me. I don’t want to stand in line for their funeral and I don’t want them standing in line for mine!” In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to Enterprise Christian Youth Camp (Royal Family Kids) P.O. Box 311432, Enterprise, AL 36331. His 84 years were filled with love for his family and friends who will never forget the humor, the joy for life, and the overwhelming passion Jimmy had for them.

Born, June 7, 1935, at home to Earl and Mable Henderson on Route One in to a farming family in the midst of the Great Depression, Jimmy grew up experiencing life as though in a Mark Twain novel. He was a skinny, little boy with straw colored hair who had a constant grin until the day he died as though he knew something funny that you didn’t. His entertainment as a boy was swimming in creeks, rolling tires, or tying a string to a June bug spinning around and watching it fly on the leash. He was the apple of his momma’s eye, but that didn’t keep him from trying her patience. His story of attempting to avoid punishment by trying to outrun her across the cotton field (unsuccessfully!) was told by Jimmy with a laugh as he describes his mom breaking off every cotton stalk on his backside all the way back to the house!

Jimmy’s years at Coffee County High School were again filled with stories of trips, adventures, pranks, and escapades that his family found too “far fetched” to believe. It wasn’t until the Class of 1954’s 50th reunion that they learned that the man voted “Best Dressed” had indeed been involved in all of these adventures and many more. This special group of friends began life together at City School on College Street, moved into adulthood together, and supported one another across the decades, through good times and hard times, and remained close to Jimmy all the way until the end of his journey.

Jimmy entered his career of farming upon his return from Auburn University. He would tell you he loved it and he remained connected to the land his entire life. However, the most significant thing in his life occurred about that same time. His sister, Peggy, introduced him to a beautiful, brown haired coed from Troy State who stole his heart. Myra Elizabeth Maddox became not only his wife of almost 60 years, but his best friend, his adviser, his card partner (and opponent), and the woman God used to complete him. She spoiled him rotten and he worshipped the ground she walked on through 60 years that never wavered, but only grew stronger. They truly only needed each other, but gave of themselves completely and sacrificially to their family. Their example of covenant marriage was powerful and will influence their offspring for generations.

More than anything, Poppie valued people and relationships. The family knew that if you went out for an evening, Poppie would know the server’s name, where they were from, and usually he would make some family or personal connection with them. He could learn someone’s life story on an elevator and that individual would be glad to “share it all” with this kind, gregarious man who was obviously interested more in others than himself. Though he loved his two daughters and sons-in-law, when the grandchildren and great grandchildren came along, Jimmy took his generosity and selflessness to a whole new level. Before the era of smart phones, he kept a photo album of his grandkids in the door of his truck that he would eagerly pull out if you asked how they were doing. His patience with them was endless as he would play with them on the floor or drive them in his tractor. He stayed in constant touch with them as they went off to college, professional school, and the work force. Not many 84 year olds are tech savvy enough to Face Time their loved ones, even if he usually could only be seen from his eyes up. His conversations would typically end with, “Well, that’s about all I’ve got….” While he intended that as a farewell, it means so much more than that. Jimmy was aware of how gracious God had been to him, and he reflected that gratitude by giving to others, “all I’ve got.” This patriarch leaves a legacy of sacrificial love and graciousness that will pour down over generations. Though we grieve with GospJAMES EARL (JIMMY) HENDERSON

One of the truly great story tellers, adventurers, and family men was lost to this world Tuesday night, July 9, 2019. James Earl (Jimmy) Henderson – known as Poppie to his grand and great grandchildren – went to be with his Lord and Savior after a brief illness. Per Jimmy’s request, there will be no formal visitation. A celebration of life for family and loved ones will be held Thursday, July 11, at Searcy Funeral Home at 11 a.m. In his own words “I know who my friends are and that they love me. I don’t want to stand in line for their funeral and I don’t want them standing in line for mine!” In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to Enterprise Christian Youth Camp (Royal Family Kids) P.O. Box 311432, Enterprise, AL 36331. His 84 years were filled with love for his family and friends who will never forget the humor, the joy for life, and the overwhelming passion Jimmy had for them.

Born, June 7, 1935, at home to Earl and Mable Henderson on Route One in to a farming family in the midst of the Great Depression, Jimmy grew up experiencing life as though in a Mark Twain novel. He was a skinny, little boy with straw colored hair who had a constant grin until the day he died as though he knew something funny that you didn’t. His entertainment as a boy was swimming in creeks, rolling tires, or tying a string to a June bug spinning around and watching it fly on the leash. He was the apple of his momma’s eye, but that didn’t keep him from trying her patience. His story of attempting to avoid punishment by trying to outrun her across the cotton field (unsuccessfully!) was told by Jimmy with a laugh as he describes his mom breaking off every cotton stalk on his backside all the way back to the house!

Jimmy’s years at Coffee County High School were again filled with stories of trips, adventures, pranks, and escapades that his family found too “far fetched” to believe. It wasn’t until the Class of 1954’s 50th reunion that they learned that the man voted “Best Dressed” had indeed been involved in all of these adventures and many more. This special group of friends began life together at City School on College Street, moved into adulthood together, and supported one another across the decades, through good times and hard times, and remained close to Jimmy all the way until the end of his journey.

Jimmy entered his career of farming upon his return from Auburn University. He would tell you he loved it and he remained connected to the land his entire life. However, the most significant thing in his life occurred about that same time. His sister, Peggy, introduced him to a beautiful, brown haired coed from Troy State who stole his heart. Myra Elizabeth Maddox became not only his wife of almost 60 years, but his best friend, his adviser, his card partner (and opponent), and the woman God used to complete him. She spoiled him rotten and he worshipped the ground she walked on through 60 years that never wavered, but only grew stronger. They truly only needed each other, but gave of themselves completely and sacrificially to their family. Their example of covenant marriage was powerful and will influence their offspring for generations.

More than anything, Poppie valued people and relationships. The family knew that if you went out for an evening, Poppie would know the server’s name, where they were from, and usually he would make some family or personal connection with them. He could learn someone’s life story on an elevator and that individual would be glad to “share it all” with this kind, gregarious man who was obviously interested more in others than himself. Though he loved his two daughters and sons-in-law, when the grandchildren and great grandchildren came along, Jimmy took his generosity and selflessness to a whole new level. Before the era of smart phones, he kept a photo album of his grandkids in the door of his truck that he would eagerly pull out if you asked how they were doing. His patience with them was endless as he would play with them on the floor or drive them in his tractor. He stayed in constant touch with them as they went off to college, professional school, and the work force. Not many 84 year olds are tech savvy enough to Face Time their loved ones, even if he usually could only be seen from his eyes up. His conversations would typically end with, “Well, that’s about all I’ve got….” While he intended that as a farewell, it means so much more than that. Jimmy was aware of how gracious God had been to him, and he reflected that gratitude by giving to others, “all I’ve got.” This patriarch leaves a legacy of sacrificial love and graciousness that will pour down over generations. Though we grieve with Gospel peace, there will never be another like Jimmy Henderson.

James Earl (Jimmy) Henderson was preceded in death by his parents, Earl and Mable Henderson; his wife and soul mate of 60 years, Myra Elizabeth Maddox Henderson; his sister Betty Henderson Kirkland Bishop; and his grandson, Parker Benjamin McQueen. He is survived by two daughters, Sherri Henderson Boyd (Ray) and Pam Henderson McQueen (Michael) all of Enterprise; five grandchildren, Dallas (Megan) Boyd of Enterprise, Julie Boyd Hallmark (Luke) of Birmingham, Nicholas McQueen (Hannah) of Enterprise, Alex McQueen (Rebecca) of Huntsville and Mitchell McQueen (Breanna) of Enterprise; five great grandchildren Townsend Kate Boyd and Baker Flinn Boyd of Enterprise, Maddox Elizabeth Hallmark of Birmingham, James Parker McQueen and Charlotte Elizabeth McQueen of Enterprise. The family eagerly awaits the arrival in two weeks of Jimmy’s sixth great grandchild, Huntington Nash Boyd. He is also survived by his sister, Peggy Henderson Smith of Freeport, Fla.; four sisters-in-law, Kate Maddox Hale (Byron) of Albany, Ga., Becky Maddox Miller of Birmingham, Sue Maddox Adams of Mobile, Melinda Maddox Hollon (Ken) of Deatsville and one brother-in-law Mike Maddox (Wanda) of Enterprise; a host of cousins; nieces and nephews. A very special thanks to Janice Fleming and Brenda Brown for the love and compassion you showered upon Jimmy on this journey.

To sign the register book or to send condolences to the family, please visit our website at www.searcyfuneralhome.com.

Searcy Funeral Home and Crematory, 1301 Neal Metcalf Rd., Hwy. 167 N., Enterprise, AL 36330, (334) 393-2273

el peace, there will never be another like Jimmy Henderson.

James Earl (Jimmy) Henderson was preceded in death by his parents, Earl and Mable Henderson; his wife and soul mate of 60 years, Myra Elizabeth Maddox Henderson; his sister Betty Henderson Kirkland Bishop; and his grandson, Parker Benjamin McQueen. He is survived by two daughters, Sherri Henderson Boyd (Ray) and Pam Henderson McQueen (Michael) all of Enterprise; five grandchildren, Dallas (Megan) Boyd of Enterprise, Julie Boyd Hallmark (Luke) of Birmingham, Nicholas McQueen (Hannah) of Enterprise, Alex McQueen (Rebecca) of Huntsville and Mitchell McQueen (Breanna) of Enterprise; five great grandchildren Townsend Kate Boyd and Baker Flinn Boyd of Enterprise, Maddox Elizabeth Hallmark of Birmingham, James Parker McQueen and Charlotte Elizabeth McQueen of Enterprise. The family eagerly awaits the arrival in two weeks of Jimmy’s sixth great grandchild, Huntington Nash Boyd. He is also survived by his sister, Peggy Henderson Smith of Freeport, Fla.; four sisters-in-law, Kate Maddox Hale (Byron) of Albany, Ga., Becky Maddox Miller of Birmingham, Sue Maddox Adams of Mobile, Melinda Maddox Hollon (Ken) of Deatsville and one brother-in-law Mike Maddox (Wanda) of Enterprise; a host of cousins; nieces and nephews. A very special thanks to Janice Fleming and Brenda Brown for the love and compassion you showered upon Jimmy on this journey.

To sign the register book or to send condolences to the family, please visit our website at www.searcyfuneralhome.com.

Searcy Funeral Home and Crematory, 1301 Neal Metcalf Rd., Hwy. 167 N., Enterprise, AL 36330, (334) 393-2273